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Goldstraw
Martin Stephen James Goldstraw of Whitecairns, JP, KCN, FSA Scot.

Arms: Argent, on a chevron between three swords erect Gules, three quills erect Argent.

Crest: On a helm with a wreath Argent and Gules a goose Argent beaked Or resting its dexter foot against an oak tree Gules fructed Or

Motto: Ab Initio Goostrey

Grant: The Court of the Lord Lyon, 21st November 2002. Register, volume 74, folio 69.

Conferral: by S. A. R. Don Carlos de Borbón-Dos Sicilias y de Borbón-Parma, Duque de Calabria, Conde de Caserta, Infante de España as a Knight Jure Sanguinis, Motto Proprio, Sacred Military Constantinian Order of St George. 13th November 2006, Book 4, Folio 55, No. 2993.

Interpretation of achievement by John A Duncan of Sketraw

All those who today bear the surname Goldstraw are descended from those bearing the surname Goostrey and the shield of my arms therefore answers that of Goostrey (Ancient) namely - Argent a Chevron between three Squirrels sejant Gules.

To differentiate I have added charges which reflect my occupation as a scrivener (the quills) and my service as a Justice of the Peace (the Swords of Justice), the Letters Patent refer to me as "Esquire in the Commission of the Peace". To add a little wry humour to my arms, Mr. Woodcock suggested, and I delightedly agreed, that the crest should be an allusion to (and a pun on) the anciently borne name of Goostrey, hence the Goose and the Tree.

The blazon for my Scots arms is exactly as in my English grant with the exception of the motto which differs in two respects; Firstly and most obviously, it is now in the expected position over the helm and crest. Secondly, the motto is recorded as "AB INITIO GOOSTREY" (From the Beginning Goostrey). I asked the Lord Lyon if he would permit a change from the motto in my English grant for the following reason: In England the status of the motto is very informal and it is not even mentioned (although it is painted on the document) in the legal patent and is therefore not part of the heritable arms and may be changed at will. This is very different in Scotland, the motto being part of the legal document becomes lawfully part of the arms and may not be changed without, or until, re-matriculation.

My English motto is very personal to me and is more relevant to my profession. In consultation with my family and in particular my heir Thomas, it was felt that as the motto in the Scots matriculation was to be permanent we would ask for one which more reflected the history and origins of our line - hence "Ab Initio Goostrey". I am pleased that L.L. allowed me to vary the English grant to allow for this.

Goldstraw is a local variant of the place name Goostrey near Holmes Chapel, which is recorded as Gostrel in the 1086 Domesday Book, Gosetre, Gorstre during the 12th and 13th century, and Goulstry in the 17th century. The place name was originally taken by Ekwall in his Dictionary of English Place names as meaning the tree belonging to Godhere, an old Saxon name, but McNeal Dodgson in the Place names of Cheshire proposes a hypothetical Old English word “gorst-treow” in the sense of gorse bush or bramble. The local pronunciation of Goldstraw probably developed along the following lines: Just as the word “cold” becomes the dialect “cowd”, and with the inclusion of the intrusive letter “(L)”, the initial part of the name would be easily associated with the word “gold” and the original form of the name just as soon forgotten. Interestingly enough, the place name is still pronounced Goostrey, and hence, is closer to its original form.

"The Scottish matriculation does not include either mention or illustration of the cross of the order"
IanGrant.jpg Gordon_Casely_Knight_of_St_John_(2).jpg goldstrawM.jpg McKee.jpg dempster.jpg
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