The Heraldry Society of Scotland

HSS Member & Forum Member Galleries


Home :: FAQ :: Login
HSS Website :: Album list :: Last uploads :: Last comments :: Most viewed :: Top rated :: My Favorites :: Search

Home > HSS Members' - Scots Arms
Click to view full size image
Kennedy
Darrel E. Kennedy

Arms: Argent, on a chevron Gules between in chief two cross-crosslets fitchee Sable and in base a bull's head cabossed Proper a Bible expanded Proper, bindings and fore-edges Or, surmounted with a crescent of the Third.

Crest: a dolphin hauriant parted per fess Or and Vert

Motto: Thoughtful Speech or Silence

Matriculated: Court of the Lord Lyon, 4th September 1989. Register; Volume 70, page 70.

Registered: Chief Herald of Canada; 31st January 1995.

1967 was the year that Canada celebrated its Centennial as a Dominion. It was also the year that I began my interest in genealogy, in July, three months after the death of my grandfather Angus Kennedy: I thought that this might be something interesting to try, in order to keep me busy during the summer months of that year. Eventually, I was able 'to cross the water,' and document my connection to one Neil Kennedy from the Isle of Tyree, Argyleshire, the farthest back that the Parish Registers would go being 1789.

Based on that research, and having 'cut my teeth' on Scots Heraldry, I approached Lyon Court about being granted arms. Since my father was living, the Lord Lyon James Monteith Grant decided that it would be most appropriate for the grant to be made out to him, with a destination of the arms to the descendants of the said Neil Kennedy, the 18th century inhabitant of the Isle of Tyree.. The grant was made the 1st day of July 1976, and recorded on page 39 of Volume 61. The blazon reads as:

Argent, on a chevron invected Gules between in chief two cross-crosslets fitchee Sable and in base a bull's head cabossed Proper a Bible expanded Proper, bindings and fore-edges Or; For a Crest: a dolphin hauriant parted per fess Or and Vert; For a motto: Thoughtful Speech or Silence.

The research showed that the line for my father flows at one point through a third son, all others being eldest sons hence the chevron being invected. The grant having been made, my arms were matriculated on 7th day of February 1977 (Volume 60, page 62) being differenced by a crescent Sable appearing on the Bible, since I am my father's second son.

The design is based on membership in the Kennedy Clan, with the red chevron and black crosses alluding to that. The bull's head was selected by the Lord Lyon to represent the origin of the family from the Isle of Tyree, in the Highlands. The Bible was selected to represent the vocation and avocation of several generations of Kennedys being teachers or ministers of religion. The dolphin was differenced from that of the Marquess of Ailsa, Chief of the Kennedys. The Motto was devised by me, as an 'echo' to the Chief's 'Avise la fin.'

The story continued as the genealogical research continued. I had discovered with the help of Dr. Margaret MacKay of the School of Scottish Studies in Edinburgh that the family had left Tyree in 1850 and sailed to Canada. Where our family line had passed through the third son research showed that the eldest son in this generation had produced only daughters and the second son disappeared from records at a very early stage and is presumed to have died young.

In the late 1980's, I engaged the services of Sir Crispin Agnew of Lochnaw as an Advocate and Herald to examine the new information and lodge a petition with the Lord Lyon to matriculate the arms as undifferenced from Neil Kennedy (Tyree) for my father, from whence I could matriculate arms anew. Sir Crispin's genealogical researcher, Hugh Peskett, was able to confirm the information, and the Lord Lyon Sir Malcolm Innes of Edingight allowed the petition. Thus, on 1st day of February 1989, the arms were matriculated for my father (Volume 72, page 15) and the chevron's edges were straightened. My arms were matriculated the 4th day of September 1989 (Volume 70 page 70. sic). The original arms were never surrendered back to the Crown; thus, my father and I were entitled to two shields each. However, the latter set are the senior line now, and the former are falling into disuse. Forty years from these dates, the undifferenced arms will be 'locked in' for my father's line. One additional interesting feature is that the standard nobiliary clause which appears in original grants was also included in the Letters Patent of these matriculations, the first time, I am told, that such has happened.

When Her Majesty signed the Letters Patent in May 1988, dated 4 June 1988, authorizing the Governor General of Canada to exercise Her Majesty's authority to grant arms to Canadians, the Canadian Heraldic Authority was created as a Directorate in the Chancellery of Honours within the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General. Headed by the Chief Herald of Canada, the decision was made that grants to Canadians by the Lord Lyon, the Kings of Arms at London, or the Chief Herald of Ireland could be registered. Registration would be an acknowledgement of the authority of prior armorial authorities, and would place on record those previous grants so that no duplications would be made by the Chief Herald of Canada.

Both of the shields for my father and for me were registered, as well as the arms of my first cousin Roger Alexander Kennedy, my document being dated 31st day of January 1995. In the Public Register of Arms, Flags, and Badges of Canada, mine is the last one in that volume, meaning it was the last one in the term of office of Governor General Ramon Hnatyshyn. The Chief Herald also saw fit at this time in the same document to grant a Badge: a gavel and scroll in saltire Sable surmounted of a griffin's head erased Or gorged with a Loyalist military coronet Gules. The Letters patent show this Badge on a Standard. The Standard is described as in the hoist the arms of Kennedy of 4th September 1979; in the fly, per fess Gules and Argent. The Motto lies on two bends sinister 'Thoughtful Speech/ Or Silence." The first section contains the crest, the second contains the Badge, and the third contains in chief an oak leaf Argent and in base a Trillium flower leaved and seeded Proper.

The Badge has symbolism to reflect the fact that I enjoy chairing meetings (under Robert's Rules of Order), have a genealogical bent for records, am a Treasurer for my church (the guardian), and have a descent from Loyalist ancestors. These latter people are those who remained loyal to the Crown and joined to fight in the American Revolution against the rebels, but in the end, had to vacate their homes. The Chief Herald now uses a special coronet to honour their military service. There is also a civil Loyalist coronet.

In the summer of 2000, two streams of activity came to a happy juncture: Athabaska Herald was seconded to a different situation for a time, and a backlog of petitions had been accumulating. I was asked if I would be interested in an appointment in the Authority office for six months. I decided to take a six month Leave of Absence from teaching. My term ran from 8 August 2000 until 31 January 2001. With the rate at which paper flows, my Commission as Assiniboine Herald was dated 1st December 2000, to be a limited term until 31st January 2001. That day, I left Ottawa to return to Guelph to resume my teaching position the next day. It was during this time that the Badge of Assiniboine Herald was developed. In 2002, I will be granted a second Badge: two scrolls in saltire Ermine surmounted by a griffin's head erased charged on the neck with a chalice Gules.

The Badge has symbolism to reflect similar things as above, and I use this as my Badge as a Heraldic Consultant. The scrolls with ermine spots represent the writing on vellum as documents. The griffin is the guardian of this information; and the chalice represents sacrifice and the office of herald, the first being necessary to have been the latter.

munro-arms.jpg Macpherson.jpg Kennedy.jpg purves-arms~0.jpg Randall.jpg
Rate this file (current rating : 1.7 / 5 with 14 votes)
Rubbish
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Great